Follow by Email

Saturday, June 23, 2018

Eyes, Sheep and Hexen

After first surgery,
eye protection in place.
New temporary
glasses
My journey in the world of cataract removal and
recovery continues. After the surgery for my right eye was completed last week, I fell into a world of the Impressionist school of art. Not as much fun as it might sound, even if you like that school of painting. Nothing beyond the reach of my arm was in focus, which is much more disconcerting, even, than it sounds. It is the stuff that makes a "long term variable periodic housekeeper" into a slob, turns a farmer paranoid (is that black spot in the back field a cat, hunting or is is a loose Langshan chicken or something else that might be hunting both of the above and all but drove me mad.  The good news was that, this week during my one week follow up visit to the doc, I was able to wring an eyeglass prescription out of them AND get they papers for my drivers license eye exam completed and signed! The bad news is that the pressure in my eyes (which leads to glaucoma) was high enough to generate a prescription for more eye drops and a follow up visit next week. The worse news is that apparently the "your vision may take months to stabilize" and/or "these drops can cause blurry vision" resulted in the glasses, that worked wonderfully the day they were prescribed, not working at all yesterday. LOL Fortunately today was better.

Major Tom, left, being carried to the truck by Tractor Guy
and Enterprise, center, in the arms of Dr. Jim Weber
accompanies by Ann Bryant, both of U of ME Orono.
On another happy note, this was the week in which we brought home two new lambs... wethers (former rams) from the University of Maine Icelandic flock. Enterprise and Major Tom (the University naming scheme this year, "stars," was loosely interpreted by the students, as you can see! 
Enterprise, front and Major Tom, back, enjoying a
sweet feed treat in their new home.
Enterprise has proven to be quite a loudmouth... every bit a match for Moose. Between his hollering and Moose's response last night, Tractor Guy did NOT get lots of sleep! I like to give new critters a bit of time to settle in and meet their new housemates through the fence before throwing anyone together, so they will converse with Ribgy though the fence until early next week, when the crazy round of away missions ends and we will be here to keep an eye on everyone.

In the hex world, I shipped out this lovey and hugs Protection from the Evil Eye sign -- a full 4 feet in diameter -- this week as well. It's gone to Indiana and I am hoping to see pictures of it in its new home soon!

Fortunately the mad week of away missions seems to be coming to and end. Sunday is "chicken plucking day" with friends and the local chapter of the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association,
so after getting the sheep shelter set up, we prepped for fowl catching after dark tonight. We will head out early tomorrow, with all of the spare roosters, the single remaining meat chicken from our first lot of them and our tom turkey and join in a group effort to butcher, clean and package everyone's fowl. I will be very glad to have the extra roosters out of the way; there have been far too many rooster wars of late and with my vision being less than usual, it has been very stressful hearing their fuss and not necessarily having a clear view of what is going on.




Saturday, June 9, 2018

Finding the Flow

Sometimes a slow day is an "in the flow" day.

Since abbreviating Saturday's scheduled away day and passing totally on the event I had volunteered to attend on Sunday, I have been in a slow flow that seems to really be kicking butt in the productivity department.

It all started with Tractor Guy pushing himself to get the final bit of primary tillage done in the west (perennial) garden. He is a true northerner with a pale completion and knows he needs to stay out of the noonday sun... but like the "mad dogs and Englishmen" of the saying (though don't call him English!) he does it anyway. Then gets overly irradiated and suffers the next few days, which puts him off his flow.

Since I had previously made contact with the owners of the two solar powered homes that interested me (totally off grid, one running 120v AC and the other 12v DC) and plan to, some time in the future, get a chance to see their systems, I just took myself to the nearby home to help serve refreshments, and TG stayed home.

It's a BAG!
I still was not really wanting to spend a day away on Sunday, so I contacted the organizer of the event I was going to help with and found out that even without me, it would have sufficient volunteer support. As much as I had been looking forward to attending -- and had even taken part in a "knit along" project for the event -- I stayed at home.

We had much needed rain  Monday and Tuesday -- along with another unseasonable cold spell. At least the mercury only dropped to the 40s; I have heard of 30s this late in the year for a low, and after all, if mid-May is the average last frost date, there needs to be some much later than that, if my elementary school math is correct! It was not yet time to put the transplants out (and they are still on the porch, awaiting proper weather) but I did get the warm season crops seeds in the ground Sunday, in a whirlwind of gardening! I planted multiple rows of beans, corn, experimented with just throwing heads of wheat that I had used stalks from for crafting and transplanted the boc choy into gaps in the brassica rows.  This was the first day I had spent out in the garden all day long, and I was pleased and surprised that, while I was actually gardening, my back did not hurt!
Pea trellis... just in time. Last year's
sunflower stalks hold the plastic mesh.
I also got the pea trellis finally secured, or so it seems. I tightened up the plastic mesh where it attached to the sunflower stalks and used tent stakes and bailing twine to secure the dry sunflower tripods to the earth.

By the time rainy Monday and Tuesday came around, I was ready for slow indoor days. I planned a baking day for Monday and did it up right! Started off with a pound cake mix (strawberry shortcake!) followed by large batches of medicinal cookies for Tractor Guy and chocolate chip ones just for cookies. Even got all the dishes done... twice! And in between mixing and baking, I continued to sort and putter in the kitchen area, getting stuff sorted to appropriate locations.

9 yards of shirt fabric, blowin' in the
wind.
Tuesday, my organizing took to my work room, as I have to get ready for a big sewing project -- summer shirts for Tractor Guy! Getting the spinning and knitting stuff in a bit of order, kicking things that need to go to the garage out there liberated enough room to move the sewing machine to a more active location for a while and freed up enough space for the small "market table" (6' folding version) which I will use for cutting.

What amazes me in all this, is that on none of these days did I feel like I was working hard! They all, including garden Sunday, felt like "just loafing along, lazy days!" Heck, on Tuesday when I sat down for my morning coffee break, one of our kitties (Little Girl) hopped up in my lap for a pet-and-purr session and both she and I cat-napped off and on for almost 4 hours! If that's not a lazy day activity, I don't know what to call it -- unless it's "just in the flow" as it surely did not have a negative impact on getting stuff done.

Again, on Wednesday, the day started out slow. With his new edibles doing their job, TG slept even later than I did (those of you with chronic pain know how much it saps your energy. I hope those of you who have never been in that space never have to learn).

Some days start out with a burst of energy and then, just slide sideways into frustration.  After getting the hay burners out to their new pasture with LONG grass (picture very happy sheep and goats) I got busy with the next bit of outdoor projects before the rain, again. I cardboarded and mulched 4 more trees -- fruit trees this time, including two pear trees that got taken back quite a bit by the past winter. With the cardboard and mulch around them they no long blend quite as well into the almost equally long grass. Can I say we REALLY need to mow? LOL But between TG's health, needing to cultivate and rain, well the mower is still not on the tractor. I am thinking a walk-behind tiller will be in the future soon, or at least needs to be.

One of the latest hex signs
at its new home in
South Portland, Maine!
After dealing with the trees, and with Dump Day coming soon (new moon is on Wednesday next, but that is also eye surgery day, so dump run will have to be Saturday) and a need for an away mission on Friday to connect with turkey polts, I decided to empty and sort the contents of the old farm truck. It took a while but I have a bag of recycles, one of trash in the garage from behind the seal and all of the tie down straps are organized in an old, almost dead dishpan. I put my tie downs and ropes in their stash place, along with the jumper cables and we were ready to rock and roll Friday, off to the Maine coast to connect up with some baby turkeys and more meat chickens, all of which are now peeping like mad fools under lights in my work room.  Oh, the joys of being an artist/farmer.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Through the Mists, Dimly

I am celebrating the regaining of an hour plus each day, as I no longer have to endure 4 rounds of 4 eye drops a day. One round of non-medicated doesn't seem much bother, now. LOL

I had been concerned that my lack of vision was making me, as in my person, vulnerable. Now, I live in Maine and in the country at that, so this is hardly a serious issue, as it would be in many other places. But not having a clear view of potential issues here on the farm remains disturbing. I mistook a red milk crate in the neighbor's yard for a dead chicken, which is funny... but on the other hand all but 2 of our 14 meat birds have gone missing in the last two days with no sound from either the fowl or the LGD. This IS concerning. On the other hand, it appears my intuition is alive, well and taking up the slack, as I was confident enough in the "recognition" of a neighbor and her car (her from the back, car by color and general shape) when we passed them, with hood up alongside the road, that I had Tractor Guy, who was playing chauffeur, turn around and go back to offer aid.

48" Abundance, Prosperity and Smooth
Sailing through Life sign destined for
South Portland Maine.
 In the hex world, it has been a bit of challenge to get signs cut and painted around "no dusty environment" cautions from the doc and the impressionist painting that is how I currently see the world, with or without my glasses, but this big sign, a standard design with custom colors, was picked up by its new owner here at hex central this week, and I shipped out a 24" Welcome to Massachusetts early in the week. I have a 24" Protection sign in process, a 48" blank cut for the Protection from the Evil Eye which is next on the list and another 24" sign on order as well. With my next, and last surgery on June 13, I should be able to complete these two and get a good start on the third before then.

Pea trellis, using last year's sunflower stalks!
After the wet and cold early spring, late spring has turned bone dry. I thought for sure that the seeds I had soaked and planted the same time as the peas -- which germinated quickly -- had all given up the ghost, or that my vision at ground level near by feet was bad enough that I could not tell their spotty germination from the emerging weeds. I knew the peas could use a drink, so I had Tractor Guy haul the garden hoses (it takes two, 75' lengths, to reach the area of this year's garden) and added a 4 port hose manifold, with Y splitters on a couple of the ports, to try to maximize efficiency. With many soaker hoses to deploy, I attacked the watering issue and on that particular trip to the garden I was surprised -- and rewarded -- to see seedlings! Every row showed germination, even the spinach, though it is spottier than the beets, carrots and chard. My brassica is still struggling and I will either have to try to start more seedlings or buy some starts. Likely I will do both this coming week. We continue to have occasional lows in the 40s, with Sunday night's forecast low predicted to be 41F so I am loath to transplant the tomatoes and vine crops. Maybe next week. #hopeforagoodseason