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Sunday, March 18, 2018

Crazy Things are Happening!


Individual
Strength
Power through
Community
As Women's Empowerment Month winds down, I still have some of my small, indoor signs for individual strength and power through community connections available for sale. These are limited edition signs for 2018, and when they are gone, they are gone.

That IS a
picnic table!
Meanwhile, we have been working with the result of two nor'easters in two weeks, with little usable melt. In one way, it's a good thing, as I can currently walk the snowshoe-trod path to the truck without putting the "big feet" on. However, it's not so good for Tractor Guy, who still does not have snowshoes (they are really hard to find for really big guys!) so he has to bulldoze through. We now have two paths down to the truck, one for each of us. It does make it easier for me not to have to avoid the chasms his breaking through make.

While the snow has slowed the arrival of spring (to the minds of many, at least; I know it never really springs until later in April) I have been busy with fiber fun. Ply magazine has a newly released issue all about flax and linen and I have been browsing through it a bit. This is in complete contrast to my usual way of doing something I have never done before. Usually I totally thrash around and learn by what happen, and what doesn't. I think the bit of reading I have done constitutes more research on this one topic than on all the other things I've done for the first time, in the past! I am anxious to be able to plant my 4 varieties of flax seed but meanwhile I have been planning and building some distaffs.

Birdcage distaff, complete
except for fiber!
The distaff -- so common in the olden days as a tool for spinning, that it came to be used as a word for womankind, in general -- is not often seen nowadays, nor featured for sale nearly as often as spindles or even spinning wheels. There are free-standing distaffs that are used with a wheel and a multitude of smaller designs to be held in your hand or tucked into a belt and laid over your arm when spindle spinning, or spindling as I have seen it called.

They can be used with wool, though are often considered essential for spinning flax. One of the things I have learned in my recent reading is an alternative way to hold strands of flax, wrapped in a dish towel in you lap and I may try that when I get to that stage of my flax project... many many months from now. For now, playing with distaffs is proving to be fun.

The style that most appeals to me is called the "birdcage" distaff as seen above, and I have thus far made that one, am working on a second and have a smaller third one on my mind. The first two, shown at the right in their initial stages, are 3/4" and 5/8" dowels, with thin wooden disks, 6" in diameter, from the craft store. We located the exact center of the disks and drilled holes of the exact size to fit snugly onto the shafts.  I used a heavier basket weaving reed for the "cage." It needed soaking before being formed around the disk, just as one
Distaff in process - and a
metaphorical self portrait, too!
would if making a basket. The reeds were held in place with pipe clamps until they dried into the proper shape. then the excess was trimmed off, and the reeds were glued permanently in place. I used the pipe clamps, again, to hold them securely.

After this glue dried, I wanted to wrap the top and bottom of the cage area with raffia for decoration, which I did. I secured it with Titebond, as I had the reeds. I felt the wrappings needed a bit of help to stay in place, so I rubbed some of the Titebond into and over the strands, which -- unfortunately -- still shows when it is dry.  I had to hold the ends of the raffia in place until
all of that dried, too. A little tension on the wrapping from tying the ends to the animal crate on which I was working did the trick!

In case you are curious as to what creature is currently inhabiting the crate, let me introduce Buttermilk, the house
chicken! Buttermilk is a Red Ranger meat rooster who managed to elude the "bus to freezer camp" on a friend's homestead. She is a softhearted soul who, each year, had wished to not have to butcher all of the meat birds they raised, so when this one managed to avoid capture, she convinced her husband that it was fate. Buttermilk has been living with their flock, but was having issues with the rooster in their laying flock. After having him and getting to know him so well, they could not bring themselves around to the "delicious solution" and I offered to help them out. They know what his eventual fate will be... and it must be so. These meat birds, also a crossbreed like the better known Cornish cross, are able to forage and are much less likely to develop leg issues and be unable to walk like the Cornish if carried past 10 weeks. However, they do eventually develop issues and being crossbreeds, would not breed true if kept. And we have our new crop of Freedom Rangers chicks coming on April 4. They will need the space in the house that Buttermilk is currently occupying. So, between now and then... a delicious solution will be found.

I am considering, since I usually skin the birds and his plumage is so lovely, of trying to tan his hide, feathers-on of course, to make a hat. We will see if that happens. But meanwhile, it is really a joy to have him for an organic alarm, encouraging me to arise with the dawn, which is quickly receding into the early morning hours. These last couple of weeks, and the next few coming, are one of the two parts of the year when the rate of change of day length is the greatest. And even if you don't mess with the clocks (I don't) it tends to throw everything off. Maybe I need to plan on a house rooster each spring!